Don’t let go…

I was going through some older photos and came across this one…and it reminded me…

It’s an ongoing process – this process of choosing to see the light.

Sometimes I find myself being piled beneath the layers of this life – the stress, the anxiety.

There will always be broken places, there will always be flaws, there will always be aches, always missing pieces.

But if I only look to those, I miss the beauty in front of me…the good, the joy, the hope, and the light that shines even in the darkest nights.

Wherever you are, whatever you are going through, don’t lose hope.

Do what you need to do to shift your focus, to find the light…and keep choosing it again and again…and no matter what, don’t let it go.

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Reach for the light

Community.

This thing we build on love, on mutual understanding, on acceptance, on camaraderie, and on empathy birthed from hardships.

Life is so breathtakingly beautiful. And in its beauty, it can also be very hard at times.

Life’s about holding the light for one another.

It’s about clinging to hope and faith.

It’s about clinging to love.

And it’s about reaching out our hands and uniting.

This is how strangers become friends, and this is how we remember we are never, ever alone.

Reach for the light.

Together

Sometimes I sit here…staring at this screen…and I just don’t know what to say. Because sometimes, it’s just not easy. Sometimes, what you want to say and what you feel just aren’t on the same frequency. Sometimes, what pours out of your heart doesn’t always pour out onto paper.

And then fear. Vulnerability.

To me, fear always felt like a hostage situation. As though I was somehow handcuffed to circumstances I couldn’t break away from. And all the while, I’d forget that I also possessed the key to those very same handcuffs.

I was both the hostage and the one holding myself captive.

There’s something incredibly overwhelming about being brought to your knees in pure gratitude. About having your vulnerability bring people together. About being a part of something so much bigger than your self.

There is something incredibly overwhelming about being seen. For all that you are. All that you were. And all that you hope to be.

When I look at it, I am reminded of a fundamental truth…a truth that I nearly let pass me by in my river of sadness. I am reminded that while our own walk with God is just that…our own…our walk through life was never meant to be taken alone.

Because that’s what this life is really about. Crying together. Laughing together. Living together. Reaching out to the heavens…together.

My dear autism and special needs parents

My dear autism and special needs parents:

On the days you feel your worst,

remember that you are beautiful

On the days you feel like you don’t know what you’re doing, know that you are brilliant

On the days you feel exhausted and can’t go any further, look back and see how far you’ve come

On the days you feel you can’t handle another battle,

look at your scars and be proud of the ones you’ve won

On the days you feel alone, know that you never are…

Even if you don’t think you can push through, you can – one step, one breath (one coffee, one set of eye pads) at a time💙

Sleep is so often something we don’t get as autism parents. Our kiddos can have a particularly challenging time falling or staying asleep.

For a while our challenge was the staying asleep. Now it’s BOTH falling asleep and staying asleep.

I often wonder how long it takes before the human body can’t take anymore…

I wonder how long I can function on such little sleep.

I wonder how my child can have so.much.energy. without having slept.

And then from somewhere, the strength keeps coming.

Moment by moment, breath by breath, I hold on to hope.

Hope turns the impossible into possible…and sometimes that’s all we need to get us through.

Hope for this moment, hope for this day. Hold on to hope my dear friends.

Heartiversary

Four years ago today, as snow began to heavily blanket the earth in the early morning hours, we prepared for the unpreparable.

I remember my head and heart in constant battle as we learned the medical team was having difficulty getting to the hospital due to road conditions. If they didn’t arrive and surgery was postponed I’d get to hold on to my baby just a little longer…I wouldn’t have to face this.

My head knew he needed surgery to survive but my heart and arms just wouldn’t let him go. The halls were silent that morning but for my muffled cries. I was numb as Scott and I wheeled him to the OR doors. I fought the fearful thoughts creeping in my mind, as this walk eerily felt like a funeral procession…and I was so afraid it was.

I was cold and hollow and at the same time, full of more love and warmth than I’ve ever known.

Physically ill with fear, my stomach was somersaulting in my throat, then plummeting to my feet and back up again. In one minute I was preparing myself to say a forever goodbye and in the next, I knew with all that was in me, that he would be okay. I was like a ball with all the pain of being slammed to the ground and then tossed high up to the sky in exhilarating joy. Up and down, up and down, for all the hours of his surgery until I could lay my burning and bloodshot eyes on him once again.

(1/3/14 post op)

I’ve never spoken of the fear I had in this very moment. It’s something I try not to think about too much. It wasn’t for lack of faith in our medical team, it was the knowledge that our children are never really ours…they belong to God…and He calls them home in His time. His time – not mine. I was not in control.

Would Luke’s purpose have been served in his one month and 10 days on this earth? I prayed with all that I was, that it wasn’t. I prayed for a long, healthy, happy life. Together.

Our walk down winding and sterile halls that morning was a walk to new life. It was a walk to rebirth. The door to Luke’s heart was opened that morning and he was gifted life for the second time. Life I could not ever give him.

(Happy Heartiversary cake)

There are times on this earth when we can prepare…and there are times when no amount of preparation will ever be enough. Times we are in control and times when all control must be surrendered. In those hours all we can do is hold on to each other, to Love. Hold on to faith. Hold on to the Peace that there is so much more than this life…so much more.

As mom to a heart warrior, I honor life with that knowledge, living every day in love, faith and so much thankfulness.

Happy Heartiversary, my sweetest Luke.

❤️💙

Faith Renewed 

It’s Spring. And I’ve been caught in my own deep winter for far too long.

The leaves have long since fallen, nature unclenching her fist. And I am brought back to the resounding discomfort that often comes with letting go. The pain of watching something fall from a tightened grasp.

Winter came.

And for me, Winter stayed.

I knelt on the ground, picking up the crumbled and crisped leaf, its vibrant beauty lost from months of cold and snow and rain. And that’s when I realized it – I have been caught up in my own cold winter. Clenched fists, fighting, struggling to stay on that limb and not fall to the cold, barren ground beneath. Hanging on to the bud so tightly, I lost sight of what comes next…

Spring.

An incredible time of growth and renewal. A time when all that once was, turns into everything it can be. A time that could never exist if the trees were not willing to release everything in their due time.

Nature does not resist letting go because it’s afraid of the loss. Nature embraces letting go because it creates space for something new. Something beautiful. Nature does not endure in the name of grief – it endures in the name of possibility.

Sometimes we have to let go of the beauty we once created – a person, a place, a deeply rooted dream. We have to breathe like blowing wind, carrying remnants of seasons past, leaving the ache of absence behind.

We must believe in nature’s greatest act of surrender – trusting that after every cold winter, Spring always comes.

…And I haven’t done a great job of believing.

Trust me when I say, you don’t want to see me right now.

My eyes are tired and swollen from crying. My hair is an unruly mess. My skin is dry and cracked. I’m dehydrated and depleted from surviving on caffeine. My barista has seen more of me than my friends and my at-home coffee Ninja has been on overdrive.

Lately, I don’t even recognize myself.

All I can ever think of is my bed. Sleep. And yet it never comes. My mind racing – it’s like a penned horse, bucking and jerking for the longing of unbridled freedom and the serenity it brings. I’m stuck in the confining corral of my own mind.

I think of all I need to be, want to be, to everyone and for everyone. For myself…whoever that is these days.

I’ve spent months walking through my own personal desert as crisp and cracked as that fallen leaf, and feeling as though at any moment, I would crumble to dust, pieces of me scattered and lost forever. I’d never be whole again.

I never expected to find myself here and I’ve had a hard time finding my way out. I’m still not sure I have the right map…

The landscape was treacherous and the elements fierce. Sleepless nights, discouraging days. I was afraid, isolated, lost. I was angry. I was hurt. I’ve tripped and fallen so many times, the bruises evident for months. I’ve even broken pieces of myself along the way.

But I have not given up. Or rather, He didn’t give up…and I merely pressed forth with His strength.

Sometimes it’s hard to know who you are in the midst of what everyone else believes you to be, or NEEDS you to be.

But that’s one thing the desert is really good at – it lets the sand blow against your rough exterior until finally, you uncover what lies beneath. It forces you to sit with the really hard questions so that you can sit with the really honest answers.

Answers and honesty your heart has known and tried to bury beneath the facades of “I’m okay” “I can handle this”…I’m handling this…right…?

Because sometimes – we can’t. Sometimes our handle on life and what it’s dealt us is the very thing that breaks us…we can break by our own hands. We resist the help we desperately need. We spread ourselves too thin, too often.

We want to do it all and be it all. Not for martyrdom or accolades, but because it’s who we are – we are conquerors, we are survivors, we are lovers and healers and we want it all to be okay. And sometimes, if we are honest with ourselves, it’s not that we no longer want the dream we’d once envisioned, it’s that we don’t know how to let it go and accept the new one.

We cling to the beauty of that leaf, and when it withers away, we are so consumed by the Winter – the loss – that we fail to see the transformation taking place before us. We want to get to the other side without feeling the harshness of Winter or the hot desert as it burns and wears us away.

We push it aside. We cover our ears. We hum a tune so loud we hope it drowns all the noise; sometimes, it drowns us before we can drown it. We punish ourselves repeatedly for what we cannot control.

And then, God reminds us of his faithfulness. He restores us.

We seldom become the people that we are all on our own. We become those people through love and encouragement along the way. We become those people because of those that open their arms and hearts to us when we are finding our way in the darkness. They may not have the map, but they have the compass. They don’t let us forget that Spring will come and with it, the promise – the gift – of renewed hope and faith.

Why I Won’t Light It Up Blue

On this day when everyone lights it up blue and has autism on their mind, I would just like to say that as a parent of a child with autism, all I want in this world is to understand my son and for others to try to as well.

Only a few short weeks ago, I could not say the word autism without a lump growing in my throat and my eyes welling with tears. In the early days after diagnosis, I couldn’t even so much as utter “Hi, my name is Laurel and I am calling regarding services for my son who was diagnosed with autism,” without totally breaking down while calling providers. Sometimes I couldn’t even make it past my own name and at times, had to hang up and call back later, only to cry again.

While I already knew for many months with everything that was in me, there was nothing that could ever truly prepare me to hear the words falling from the doctor’s lips. And fall they did…those words hitting the walls of my heart like concrete blocks, leaving jagged chunks of what I thought would be, could be, scattered along a path I had laid for my family. For my son.

Since that day, I’ve cried just about every day. Sometimes from sadness, sometimes anger, a lot of frustration, and most often, because of love. You see, amidst the fallen pieces – big dreams, hopes, the vivid picture I could not only see, but feel, like the strokes left behind from the artist’s brush, the texture was smooth in some places and rougher in others. Like the tiny particles remaining from that concrete rock that collided with my version of reality, they were now imbedded in the colors of my painting. As I traced the dream with my fingers I could feel smooth, then bumpy, rough…and I knew this would be forever.

This authentic and lucid dream I had was once again, not mine. It had never been mine to paint – the canvas was surely mine, but the colors and texture were not up to me to choose. I couldn’t ever have imagined the kaleidoscope that would follow…

I’d hoped for once, my maternal instinct had failed me. That the doctor would tell me I was over reacting, that every 3 year old spends incessant amounts of time organizing and perfecting, lining up trains, cars, magnets on a refrigerator. That leaving the house or transitioning activities is a challenge for any toddler. But she didn’t…

After a 3 hour observation and evaluation and an encyclopedias worth of paperwork, our entire lives, our complete history on display, I saw it in her eyes. I knew what she was about to deliver. She did it in the kindest and gentlest way, and I will forever be grateful for her compassion and empathy.

She provided us with some papers, said we were doing all the right things already, told us we could contact her at any time for any thing, gave me the warmest hug, and sent us on our way. We decided to keep it to ourselves for a while longer; we just weren’t ready to tell others.

I think some of that was fear talking. He is still little and maybe with enough therapy we could help him be as neurotypical as possible. “Neurotypical” is the politically correct word for “normal.” I just could not get past the “autism” word. I was stuck and scared.

My brain understood, but my heart hadn’t yet caught up. Even over a years worth of mother’s intuition did not prepare me. Why was this at once, so hard and yet so easy. There was overwhelming relief because – finally! Finally, we were not living this alone; it wasn’t manifested in some version of our own reality. It was real.

It’s been very real.

I’ve gotten him all the help I can find. Speech therapy, more occupational therapy, ABA therapy. I read and read and read, learning everything I possibly can about autism and sensory processing disorder. I joined online support groups where I’ve met some amazing mothers and no longer feel so alone and lost. There are friends old and new who became my angels, and they know who they are – without them, I would have crumbled. I don’t believe most people have even the slightest inkling what autism families go through – I didn’t. Add in additional diagnoses and medical challenges, and it is literally all-consuming in every sense. All day. Every day.

Initially, we were afraid to tell family and friends because we just didn’t want our little boy treated differently or analyzed. This was fear talking and I know now that those fears would have never happened. So we relied on each other for support, but as a scared mom I needed so much more, and found it in my online autism community and among amazing medical professionals I now so thankfully and lovingly call, friends.

You see, when you have a child with autism your biggest fear is the future. Not so much the near future but the distant future. Will he go to college or will he need to be cared for at home. Will he speak or will he be nonverbal forever. Will he ever have a real friend. Please Lord, will he ever call me “mom” or say “I love you” and on his own. Will he learn to point. Will he be potty trained. There’s so much more…

Just because a child does not speak, doesn’t mean they can’t communicate. Just because they don’t make eye contact, doesn’t mean they aren’t listening. If they don’t want to be touched, it doesn’t mean they are incapable of love. If they need to spin, yell, hum – it’s because it feels good, it serves a need – and it’s okay.

Autism is a spectrum disorder. A person with autism can be low on the spectrum (high functioning) meaning they can communicate and have some challenges but with time can usually manage them and live a normal life. Being high on the spectrum (low functioning) is well, the opposite usually. They are usually nonverbal individuals who could possibly need care for the rest of their lives.

It’s hard to define the autism spectrum. As the saying goes, when you meet one person with autism you meet ONE person with autism. They are all different and all extraordinary – ALL of them. They all have different challenges and strengths. Not one person with autism is the same. Please remember that. Everyone – typical or not – is their own unique masterpiece, crafted by His hand.

If I could put Luke on a pedestal, I would. He brings joy to every person he touches. He is just the most beautiful gift God has ever given me and I am so proud to be his mother. I shed many, many tears of joy because of him. My life is richer, relationships more transparent. As if all we had already been through didn’t cause me to recognize life’s value, any remaining scales have fallen from my eyes.

My canvas I thought, was already perfect. What I didn’t see was the full spectrum of colors and how the mixing, the texture, the unevenness, would be the very beauty defining our lives together. Paint poured out like tears flowing, the canvas takes new life.

The white light of soul, prism refracts. A spectrum – a beautiful kaleidoscope of vibrant color – is born. To me, Luke, and every person with autism or a “disability”, is the essence of purest white light refracted. Where life is not distorted, but clarified and transformed. It is innocence and purity, intrinsic honesty and beauty. But to see it, you must surrender your canvas to the Artist’s brush. You must trust. You must have faith.

April is Autism awareness month but for our family, it’s every day. Every day is a chance to educate others because we live in a time where it is estimated that 1 out of 68 children in this country are diagnosed with Autism and the numbers are as high as 1 in 34 in some parts of the country. I think most people know a child or person with autism. If you don’t, the day you do, smile and feel blessed, because you have met the very essence of spirit walking this earth.

I will not light it up blue because to me, autism is a beautiful kaleidoscope of constantly changing and overlapping colors.

Learn what autism really is and how you can involve children and adults with autism in your every day lives. Teach your children about autism. They will be encountering many peers on the spectrum, all different, but all extraordinary. Teach them all this, so they can become adults that will be tolerant of the changing world around them.